William Leavitt, Untitled, 1982
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Page ages page ages page ages*
Politics of the multiple
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erg's annual seminar
From February 4th to February 6th, 2015
Bozar, Brussels - Salle M and salles Terarken


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What is often defined as a mutation of contemporary publishing seems to be the symptom of a broader situation affecting economic, technical, artistic, as well as theoretical stakes. As a consequence to this situation, one witnesses a redefining of hitherto taken for granted issues and forms in terms of book-related practices, or, more broadly speaking, in relation to the notions of publishing and of the transmission of graphic, artistic, narrative or even philosophical and anthropological ideas.
For this seminar, we are defining several working axes, all of which, at some point, address a contemporary editorial situation where digital technology opens up new pathways, where contemporary and historical artistic practices linked to writing, publishing, and performance modify the roles and the identities of the various actors involved, where the idea of the book and of the film as ritualised containers may be reconsidered by following new perspectives, where the social function of exchanging and of creating both vast and restricted communities may find specific orientations.

During one of this three-day event, erg’s annual seminar is inviting KARAWANE, a research platform (workshops, lectures, conferences, screenings, and performances) accompanying between October 2014 and May 2015 the “Personne et les autres” Pavilion project initiated by Vincent Meessen and Katerina Gregos for the 2015 Venice Biennale.

* Verse taken from the poem Sacred Emily by Gertrude Stein, written in 1913 and published in Geography and Plays (1922).
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In collaboration with BOZAR CINEMA, CINEMATEK, Normal, ORPHEUS Instituut, FID Marseille, DISSENT !, Akademie Schloss Solitude,
and the support of Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles, WBI and of Service culturel de l'Ambassade de France en Belgique.

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Seminar's location : Palais des Beaux-Arts, rue Ravenstein 23, 1000 Bruxelles.
Program subject to change
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Eleanor Antin as Eleanora Antinova in Before the Revolution at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1979
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WEDNESDAY February 4th, 2015
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Morning
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9:00 – 10:00
Opening of the seminar
Welcome Note by Corinne Diserens

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Jef Cornelis, Richard Hamilton
1971; 36:37; b&w
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10:00 – 11:00
Catherine Perret, Anthropologie du ready-made

“Ready-made” is supposed to have been invented by Marcel Duchamp in 1913: the famous Bicycle Wheel.
The term "ready-made" first appeared in 1912 in the notes collected for The Green Box.
Covered by the repetition of this noun, the Duchampian invention pursued for half a century. It became reality in 1964 with handcraft and limited production of ready-made objects for gallery owner Arturo Schwartz.
Between 1912 and 1964, Marcel Duchamp transformed the ready-made concept into a compass for exploring a question that still resonates: what do we share under the name art? Under which conditions does an act become a piece of art? Under which conditions can an object be called an "art object"?
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Break
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11:30 – 12:30
Nenad Romic aka Marcell Mars, Work on Border

There are a very few expert fields where software tools didn’t become the essential part of their craft and workflows [1]. The adoption of software binds together, as Nathan Ensmenger [2] writes, “machines, people, and processes in an inextricably interconnected and interdependent system” which never goes without “conflict, negotiation, disputes over professional authority, and the conflation of social, political, and technological agendas. Software is perhaps the ultimate heterogeneous technology. It exists simultaneously as an idea, language, technology, and practice.”
Through historical overview of boundary work [3] or demarcation of science, scientific disciplines and other professionals fields and comparative analysis of the same processes for computer software world I will try to bring into the light the very moment of a convergence or a takeover of all school of thoughts by one: bureaucratic formalization; in latest incarnation: software tools.

[1] http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Workflow
[2] Ensmenger, Nathan. The Computer Boys Take over?: Computers, Programmers, and the Politics of Technical Expertise. Cambridge Mass.: MIT Press, 2010.
[3] Gieryn, Thomas F. 1983. Boundary-Work and the Demarcation of Science from Non-Science: Strains and Interests in Professional Ideologies of Scientists. « American Sociological Review » 48 (6): 781. doi:10.2307/2095325.

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Lunch Break
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Afternoon
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14:00 – 14:45
Bernadette Mayer's "Utopia" (1984) read by Will Holder for single mothers (2015, part I)

An oral publication in the series "…for single mothers" (since 2009), presenting a heterosexual, white, European male preferring to reproduce descriptions of relations typically formulated by women and queers.

Typographer Will Holder once read that orality would bring us out of the postmodern condition, and has since questioned the published states of cultural objects. He uses conversation as model and tool for a mutual and improvised set of publishing conditions whereby the usual roles of commissioner, author, subject, editor, printer and typographer are improvised and shared, as opposed to assigned and pre-determined.

15:30 – 18:00
Antony Hudek, Fiction Is a Hard Nut to Crack: Eleanor Antin’s Personas on Film

Presentation of films by Eleanor Antin: The Little Match Girl Ballet (1975, 26:30 min, color, sound), From the Archives of Modern Art (1987, 18 min, b&w, sound) and Fragments of a Revolution (2013, 24:34 min, color, sound)

Eleanor Antin’s films and videos, in which she assumes such roles as a ballerina, a nurse or a king, allow her to project various selves onto herself and the screen. Her (pseudo-)auto-biographical confabulations find themselves mirrored on the level of production: mixing theatre, dance, and the codes of early film and photography, Antin gives birth to paradoxical objects caught between periods and genres. Most paradoxical of all in these films may be the artist’s recourse to history, or histories, which she puts into tension with fiction. For Antin, the terms of history and fiction mutually strengthen one another, to the point of banding together against the entrenched traditions of narrative and archival objectivity.
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Break
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Evening, 2 concerts
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20:00 – 21:00
Morton Feldman, Two Pianos (1957)
Morton Feldman, Vertical Thoughts 1 (1963)
György Ligeti, Three Pieces for Two Pianos: Monument, Selbstportrait, Bewegung (1976)
Tiziano Manca, Sui moti apparenti (2010-2014)

Mara Dobresco, piano
Julien Le Pape, piano
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In partnership with Orpheus Instituut, Ghent
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The beauty that emerges from the doubling up of the same instrument, in particular for compositions for two pianos, is created by combining sounds or different melodic lines, or by not synchronising them when playing.
In both of Morton Feldman's pieces, performers are free to decide how long individual sounds last, how they fade-out and how they are coordinated.
While in the first of the three pieces by Ligeti – Monument – the main interest is that of intensities differentiation, in the second piece – Autoportrait avec Reich et Riley (et Chopin y est aussi) – the composer develops the technique of "piano keys blocking". Finally, the last movement – Bewegung – is constructed on ascendant or descending lines from which some notes appear like remanent images.
The concert ends with virtuoso composition of Tiziano Manca who explores sounds creation through the musicians' physiology.
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Break
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22:00 – 23:00
Chris Evans, Morton Norbye Halvorsen and Benjamin Seror, Concert

Concert will perform the songs of their 10-inch vinyl, Behave Like an Audience, released in 2013 by Sternberg Press, consisting of songs composed by Concert based on lyrics written by the artists Guy Ben-Ner, Mariana Castillo Deball, Dexter Sinister, Patricia Esquivias, Sharon Hayes, Hassan Khan and Michael Portnoy.
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Yervant Gianikian et Angela Ricci Lucchi, OH! UOMO, 2004
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THURSDAY February 5th, 2015

Morning

9:00 – 10:30
Matthew Stadler and Lisa Robertson, Making Revolution: A Reader

This work, a 1300 page intensely annotated reader that considers the idea of revolution very broadly-- cosmologically and aesthetically as well as politically-- arose naturally from an enduring friendship. Like friendship, the work aligns itself with the appetites, opacities and communal pleasures of the living body. We will discuss the habits and choices that led to making and circulating the book, as well as the useful tools we found along the way for opening and sharing space with others. Subjects will include large tables, bible paper, Google docs, double-dipping, swimming holes, various cheeses, reading, listening, marginal annotations, picnic blankets, train travel, and related topographies.
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Break
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11:00 – 12:30
Jean-François Chevrier, Mallarmé : "À qui veut !" ou le public de l'art

"À qui veut !" In 1898, Mallarmé put this phrase forward as an answer to Leo Tolstoy critics in Qu’est-ce que l’art ? The question of art was asked in two metropolises, at both ends of Europe. He was asking to whom art was intended. Tolstoy answers: to the people, to everyone, without exception. He condemns Mallarmé’s “obscurity” who answers back that the artist doesn’t “talk” to everyone but to those who want: a socially and ideologically undetermined audience, made up of individuals favorably prepared and interested enough.
While the controversy that opposed the two writers – the evangelical novelist and the atheist poet – is quite old, it illuminates the current situation. The question of art asked in terms of who it is aimed at relates to the definition of modern audiences and of any community formed in the public sphere.
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Lunch Break
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Afternoon

14:00 – 15:00
Will Holder will propose an organisation of information into a "materialist inventory" (Boris Arvatov) of vocal/ physical/published properties.
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Break
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16:00 – 17:00
Alma Söderberg and Hendrik Willekens, Idioter

Swedish choreographer and dancer Alma Söderberg has over several years gained attention with her peculiar solos in which she plays with the rhythms and musicality of body, language and sound. In 2014 she creates a duet with Belgian actor and artist Hendrik Willekens! Idioter – the title refers to the search for something we cannot even name – unfolds on individual as well as intimately intertwined levels. Söderberg develops a choreographic score for language, sound, and movement; Willekens makes perspective drawings. Together they compose music with a sampler and a drum machine. The presentation emerges as a live concert performance that each time starts from scratch. Idioter is an audio-visual adventure, a bold collage of movement, sound, and image.
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Evening

19:00 – 22:30
Yervant Gianikian and Angela Ricci Lucchi

The Italian directors Yervant Gianikian and Angela Ricci Lucchi present their work in conversation with Jean-Pierre Rehm, director of FID, Marseille.

In collaboration with CINEMATEK that will be presenting, from February 7th , a cycle of Yervant Gianikian and Angela Ricci Lucchi’s films, as well as a carte blanche - http://www.cinematek.be/?node=17&event_id=100169400

19:00 Screening
OH! UOMO
2004, color, sound, 72 min
A powerful survey of the irreparable damage to human lives caused by the First World War, Oh! Mankind derives its exclamatory title from a quote by Leonardo da Vinci arguing that the very sight of the horrors of war is capable of awakening and renewing the human conscience. Unflinchingly organising the archival footage which comprises the film, Gianikian and Ricci Lucchi create two broad categories – of displaced, sick, orphaned and malnourished children and of severely disfigured veterans. Forcing the audience to systematically confront, all at once, the ravages of war, the seemingly unruffled gaze of the camera, and the filmmakers' own tolerance for the images, forms a devastating and almost numbing meditation on man's will to destruction. A sharp retort to complacent spectatorship, Oh! UOMO is also a bold testament to the power of the moving image to awaken the viewer and to objectify the camera's subject.

20:15
DISCUSSION: Yervant Gianikian, Angela Ricci Lucchi and Jean-Pierre Rehm
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Break
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21:30 Screening
TOPOGRAFIA AEREA
2008, color, 8 min, silent
Between 1915 and 1916 either in autumn, winter or spring, a military reconnaissance plane flew over an unknown mountainous area, maybe the front of the Alps. Rather than a normal 13 by 18 plate camera fixed on the upper wing for topographic footage, a 35 mm mobile camera was used to film the underlying territory from various angles. We do not know to which side the plane belongs. In the footage it is never seen in its entirety, just minute details, more precisely the lower left extremity of the right wing. The two outer vertical posts connecting the wings bear a resemblance to those of the Brandenburg CI. The plane had two seats, the pilot’s cockpit placed under the wings and, the other, located at the back, was typically used by the observer gunner, in this particular case by the camera operator. We do not know if the plane was armed, but we suppose so. The Brandenburg was commonly called Albatros; at least one was captured intact by the Italians and was used for military purposes. It could reach an altitude of 5500 meters and speeds nearing 176 km/h. The pictures show complex aerial geography, formed of different elements. The topography of an indistinct village, with low buildings, scattered on a flat terrain, grouped in neat blocks, appear through the clouds that almost cancel the shots and all filmed from a “safe” altitude.

LO SPECCHIO DI DIANA (DIANA'S LOOKING GLASS)
1996, color, 31 min, English subtitles
The film is based on scattered footage that has been gathered together in a new form of compilation. Two boats of Caligula's lie at the bottom of Lake Nemi. In order to recover them, the lake is drained. 1926-1940: the time span of the film diary, the destination of a mythological forest and the lake, industrial history that uses archeology to document the search for 'Romanity', the roots of fascism and its imperial origins. Mussolini is behind the undertaking. On 20th October 1927 he presses a lever to initiate the draining of the lake. By the following summer the first boat is completely uncovered after the level of the lake has been lowered by 20 metres.The boat is 64 metres long and 20 metres wide. Over the next few years the second boat comes to the surface. A diviner with a pendulum unsuccessfully looks for the third of Caligula's boats in the mud.
Changes in the public image of Mussolini who comes back to Nemi on 21 April, 1940. He inaugurates the museum where the two boats have been housed. From the crowd he receives the ritual gifts that are reminiscent of the ancient legend of lake Nemi.
The Myth of Diana. The legend. The Golden Bough.
Turner on his travels in Italy in 1819. By Lake Nemi he paints 'The Golden Bough, the myth of Diana. In his book, 'The Golden Bough', James G. Frazer describes the myth and the legend. Ludwig Wittgenstein dedicates a book to Frazer's work: 'Notes on The Golden Bough'. Lake Nemi is Diana's mirror. Her forest has a guardian, the king of the forest. He is a king and a murderer at the same time. An escaping slave could tear a golden branch from the sacred tree and kill the king. All the priest kings have died a violent death. During the time of the Romans, Caligula renews the myth of Diana and kills the last priest. On the lake he builds two big ships, that may be floating temples. After he meets with a violent death in 41 AD, the ships mysteriously sink in a storm. An original caption: 'Monument to the Romans' expertise in building warships with which Roman conquered the empire and for centuries maintained its universal domination'. The film documents the metaphysical idea of the dream of conquering an empire, from its practical implementation in the African campaign. The period from when Mussolini enters Tripoli in 1926 during his 'Napoleonic Year' to the mustard gas bombs used in Ethiopia in 1935 and 1936.
Epilogue: the museum and the boats are destroyed in a fire started by fleeing German soldiers.

ARIA
1994, color, sound, 7 min
Aria is made up of two elements: scientific experimental documents related to air as well as a metaphorical film made in the beginning of the century. There has been a work on hidden images and it gives way to cosmic symbols, with a sample of Wagner's Siegfried.

ANIMAUX CRIMINELS

1994, color, sound, 7 min
Images assembled and distorted by Comerio in order to enhance fascist ideology (invisible hands encourage animals of all sizes to fight each other), reworked by the movie directors in order to find the original sequence.

FRAMMENTI ELETTRICI n° 1. ROM – UOMINI
2002, color, sound, 13 min
In the late 1940's, a bourgeois amateur film director travels with his family and meets a Gipsy family on the banks of a lake in North Italy and start filming them. They are Romani who come back to Italy after their genocide in the Nazis concentration camps.

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Vincent Meessen, Location photograph for "Un-Deux-Trois", Kinshasa, décembre 2014
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FRIDAY February 6th, 2015
KARAWANE, erg’s research platform
for the Pavilion project “Personne et les autres”, initiated by Vincent Meessen and Katerina Gregos for the Venice Biennial 2015
In collaboration with Normal, Brussels et Cinémathèque Afrique
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Morning
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9:00 – 9:30
Mweze Ngangura, Kin Kiesse
1982, 28 min, color
Kin Kiesse is an entertaining portrait of Kinshasa – capital of the country formerly known as Zaire (now Democratic Republic of the Congo) –, a city of paradoxes and excessiveness, commented by Congolese painter Cheri Samba. We get to visit the "Kin" of night clubs, buildings, richshaws, shoe-shine boys, hairdressers and poor neighborhoods, but mostly the "Kin" of music where every genres mix, from the beer fest's brass bands to rumba to so called traditional dances to the most hip orchestras.
Franco-Zairian co-production, Kin-Kiesse was awarded in Ouagadougou (FESPACO ’83), in Hammamet (CIRTEF ’83), and was selected for INPUT 1986 in Montreal.

Simon Hartog, Soul in a White Room
1968, 3 min 30 sec, color
Soul in a White Room was filmed by Simon Hartog in 1968. In this short film, we can see Omar Diop Blondin, Senegalese student in Paris who had actively took part in the spring 1968 protests. He plays in Jean-Luc Godard's La chinoise before being expelled from France. He then takes part in the protests against Senghor's president pro-French politics; these protests are violently repressed by the government. Diop is murdered in a Senegalese jail in 1973, aged 26. The sound track features song Cousin Jane by English band The Troggs.

9:30 – 10:30
Vincent Meessen and Katerina Gregos, about Personne et les autres, Recompositions

Newly arrived from Kinshasa, Vincent Meessen discusses his research work and his collaborative approach articulated in this instance around the cover of an unpublished musical form even though it was composed in the midst of May 1968 by a Congolese student who was a member of the Situationist International.
From a pragmatic perspective, he puts his intentions to the test. Going beyond the musical sphere, the act of composing is approached as a way of establishing links through time and space while producing a mutual mutation of subjectivity through polyphony and heterogeneity.

Katerina Gregos will outline the project for the Belgian Pavilion, Personne et Les Autres, presenting the key ideas and the artists. The exhibition aims to challenge traditional notions of national representation in the Biennale, to reflect upon the legacy of Internationalism, and calls into question the Eurocentric idea of modernity by examining a shared avant-garde heritage - marked by an artistic and intellectual cross-pollination - between Europe and Africa.

10:45 – 11:50
Raoul Peck, Lumumba : La mort du prophète
1992, 69 min, color, in French with English subtitles
The documentary on the first prime minister of independent Congo, Patrice Lumumba and his rapid assassination, is simultaneously a rich reflexion on processes and methods of remembrance and memory. Peck creates a film that goes beyond the mere preservation of a historical record. Rather, the film performs analytic historical work as it delves into the conflicted historical record in which Lumumba is remembered. The documentary is narrated by the director, Raoul Peck, as he reconstructs a story that interweaves his own personal experiences and the circumstances surrounding the murder of Lumumba. Peck is in Belgium, and uses shots of Brussels to establish his location and contrast with the archival footage he combines to tell Lumumba's story. Peck uses an experimental approach to reveal the ongoing forms of cultural censorship that have attempted to erase Lumumba and his legacy.
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Break
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12:15-13:15
Maryam Jafri, Between Storyboard and Grid: Some Recent Photo Works
Followed by a discussion with Katerina Gregos

Maryam Jafri will discuss some recent photo works including her recent photo work Independence Day 1934-1975 (2009-ongoing) which will be presented in her solo exhibition at Bétonsalon Centre d’Art et de Recherche in Paris in March 2015. Independence Day 1934-1975 is fueled by an interest in questions of heritage and the archive, and the role of photography in the formation of historical and national narratives during the process of decolonization in Asia and Africa. She will also briefly touch upon her related photo series Getty vs. Ghana, Corbis vs. Mozambique, Getty vs. Kenya vs. Corbis (all 2012) which focus on issues of copyright, digitization, and the foreign ownership of national heritage. These three works will be presented at the Belgian Pavilion at the Venice Biennial, along with a new work specially commissioned by the Pavilion.
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Lunch Break
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14:00 – 15:00
Marc Dachy, "Dans la vie n'est intéressante que la fantaisie chevauchant le hasard": Génie de Clément Pansaers. Son œuvre et sa revue Résurrection

At the outset of his work on avant-gardes, when he was not yet 20 years old, Marc Dachy dedicated himself to reveal Clément Pansaers' figure and published some of his previously unpublished work. He then published all of his poetry work (Bar Nicanor, éditions Champ Libre / Gérard Lebovici, 1986) and produced a special issue of journal "Plein Chant" ("Meeting pansaérien" - n° 39-40) as well as studies and articles about Clément Pansaers. Clément Pansaers – who died very early, in 1922 – is the author of a very fulgurant work. He was one of the most impressing Dada writers. His work is part of a political context in which he shows anti-colonialism and sympathy for Spartacist uprising in Brussels together with his fabulous friend Carl Einstein whose cubist novel "Bébuquin" he published, in French, in his pacifist and internationalist journal "Résurrection". Marc Dachy will talk about all this.

15:00 – 16:00
Discussion between Gérard Berréby and Gilles Collard, La Révolte et son double

Post-war new global political balance sparked another social critic mainly around the journal Socialisme ou Barbarie against the two poles of triumphant capitalism – Stalinian and liberal. A new artists’ revolt confirmed Dadaist art death sentence but all the while committing to “produce art” in every aspect of life, including political, by violently overthrowing current order. Meanwhile, horrified observations proved the submission of the poor to their miserable life as well as the complete contempt for life of some rebellious groups who thought that in order to lead the “big game”, they had to kill and betray. At the time, suspicion of general ideas, self and of this very suspicion have expressed itself in some original pieces of work.
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Break
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16:30 – 17:45
Kenza Sefrioui, Souffles : Pionnier dans la pensée d'une politique culturelle au Maroc

Magazine Souffles (1966-1972), has gathered poets, artists and intellectuals who wanted to finalise Morocco's independence. Abdellatif Laâbi, Mostafa Nissabouri, Abraham Serfaty and their friends - among whom some have transformed this cultural magazine in a platform for Moroccan’s Marxist-Lenist movement - were offering to decolonise culture. Authors of Souffles were worried about the current state of culture in Morocco: there was no state cultural politics and therefore no structuring nor thriving of this domain, which should be a lever for human, social and economic development. Priority to tourism lead to "folklorisation" of culture which was simplified to low quality products, stuck in clichés and deprived of its vitality and of its pioneering power. This project - which was consciously orchestrated by the regime thereby enabling it to impose its authoritarian and reactionary power - lead to a lack of a healthy economic cycle of culture that could enable artists to make a living from their art; to the increase of second-rate productions; and to the dependency of artists and audiences to foreign cycles. All this could therefore lead to acculturation. Today, the analysis found in Souffles is still current and in April 2010, Abdellatif Laâbi called for a National Pact for culture, supported by civil society.

Marion von Osten, Radical aesthetics in the Maroccan avant-garde magazine Souffles

The Souffles Magazine published in Rabat from 1966-72 has been often perceived as a avant-garde literature magazine and seldom as a transnational and transdiciplinary enterprise, representing translocal discourses in the visual arts and films as well as manifestos and statements from the Tricontinental solidarity movement. Relations and transfers between radical art practices and anti-colonial discourses, the conditions of their production as well as the transnational context in which aesthetic proposals emerged and circulated, are of main interest for me as an artist, writer and film- and exhibition maker today. First, in search of intergenerational affinities across the Mediterranean beyond common binary descriptions of an African and European cultural production and second, because relations expressed in the magazine from local crafts production to the re-reading of the Bauhaus legacies also points to discussions around transculturation, pre-capitalist economies, pedagogical turns and the societal function of culture production and the arts.

Followed by a discussion, moderator Lotte Arndt

17:45 – 19:00
Closing: Discussion between Catherine David and Vincent Meessen
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Evening
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20:00-22:30
Carte Blanche to Jean-Pierre Rehm, Director of FID – Festival International du Cinéma de Marseille.
Jean-Pierre Rehm will introduce the films and the evening will conclude with a discussion.

In collabortation with FID Marseille, and DISSENT!, an initiative of Argos, Auguste Orts and Courtisane, in the framework of the research project “Figures of Dissent” (KASK/Hogent).

Salomé Lamas, No Man’s Land
Portugal, 2012, 72 min
Is Paulo a mythomaniac? We will never know, but it is his stories that lead the danse macabre of an existence guided by arms. Through fixed shots, in a unique and stripped-down interior, the camera records his words and his laddish mask. Starting out as a simple soldier in Angola, he says, but keen to cut off the ears of black people during the war for independence from Portugese colonisation, he then worked as a mercenary here and there, and finally for various European states against the Basque movement. Paulo calmly boasts of his evilness, his efficiency and his skill as a Samurai killer, until the camera cuts away to show him in the middle of African immigrants, cooking under a bridge, a typical pathetic tramp, suddenly disarmed to play housemaid. The real career path, whatever the details, of someone who has always confused horror with the ordinary, and has been fed on obscene and conquering mythologies. FIDMarseille Catalog 2013

Pere Portabella, Mudanza

Spain, 2008, 20 min
Mudanza, Granada, family home of poet Garcia Lorca. There is no one here but removal men who are emptying each and every room from their furnitures, paintings, etc. An empty home full of lights and traces will remain, which has become the cenotaph of the poet whose body has never been found (he was murdered in 1936 by the Fascists). Seventy years later, Portabella – whose filming skills are impressing – composes more than a tribute: a funeral elegy. Jean-Pierre Rehm. FIDMarseille Catalog 2010

Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Phantoms of Nabua

Thailand, 2009, 11 min
It's night time, a neon light lights an empty playground. Aside, on a makeshift outdoor screen, we can see the image of a village that is being struck by a lightening at a steady pace. When it finally gets dark, we can see the shapes of young boys. They take turns at shooting a blazing ball that shapes incandescent lines in the grass. Every lights – the neon light, the lightning and the fire – echoes in the middle of a smoke that rises from the ground. The game speeds up until the ball touches the screen and consumes it, leading to a new scene that the small group will contemplate, stripping off the projector's beam: a ray without image.
In a very concise way, this film aims at touching upon a very precise historic event: war and the destruction of a village: Nabua. FIDMarseille Catalog 2010

Benjamin Tiven, A Third Version of the Imaginary
Kenya/USA, 2012, 12 min
In this very short, very intense film, we see and understand, as we so rarely do. In a place that acts as a film library in Nairobi, guided by the manager of the site, we follow a presentation of the archives shot in Kenya. From the real difficulties inherent to conservation, we suddenly move on to others. The question of language, of the representation of a language such as Swahili, shapes it into those motifs associated with censure, it is the links between image, language and censure that appear. And yet Benjamin Tiven does not consider this complex ensemble as the subject of his work — but as the very material of his very own judiciously enigmatic film. FIDMarseille Catalog 2013

Lee Lynch et Lee Ann Schmidt, Bower’s Cave
USA, 2008, 14min
Bower's Cave addresses the Indians' history and archives. How to pay tribute to their culture, to their history? How to film their hand-crafted and artistic production? Both subjects are addressed with a museologic and cinematic rigour. FIDMarseille Catalog 2009
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Nida Sinnokrot, As In Those Brief Moments, 2011-2013
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Salles Terarken 2 & 3
February 4th, 5th and 6th, 2015

Nida Sinnokrot, As In Those Brief Moments
2011-2013

In collaboration with Akademie Schloss Solitude, Stuttgart

As In Those Brief Moments is a continuation of Nida Sinnokrot’s work developing what he calls a “horizontal cinema”. With this horizontal film loop the mechanics of the projective apparatus literally turn traditional projections on their side and strips them of their formalism. The film loop passes through multiple modified projectors as it travels on a horizontal rather than vertical plane. Since the film is shot with the camera turned 90° on its side, the images becomes properly oriented when projected. In addition, since the projectors are shutterless, the frame lines are visible, reminiscent of a series of Muybridge photographs. The illusion of motion is achieved through a “stepping” effect rather than through intermittence of vision and, because multiple frames are projected simultaneously, an architectural as well as frame to frame semantic is achieved. The projected images are not bound by traditional 24 frames per second but rather move with speeds ranging from 0-100 frames per second depending on audience interaction. The constituent parts of the filmic vocabulary are thus reconstructed. Images that precede and follow create multiple planes in which past, present and future exist simultaneously as a function of speed. This alternative grammar is a natural extension of Diaspora and immigrant expression, whose consciousness is informed by a multiplicity of previous locations.

Chimurenga, about a transnational publication

Chimurenga is a pan African publishing structure of writing, art and politics founded in 2002 by Ntone Edjabe and based in South Africa. For the seminar, Chimurenga will put all of his publications printed and on line at the disposal of everyone. These publications will reflect the history of his multiple editorial projects (journals, magazines, books and online radio).

Wednesday 4th February, 18:00, exceptional screening of
Herbert Danska, Right On!

USA, 1970, 78 min

Directed by Herbert Danska. Produced by Woodie King, Jr. With Gylan Kain, David Nelson, Felipe Luciano. Described as “a conspiracy of ritual, street theater, soul music and cinema," Right On! is a pioneering concert film, a compelling record of radical Black sentiment in 1960s America, and a precursor of the Hip Hop revolution in musical culture. Shot guerilla-style on the streets and rooftops of lower Manhattan, it features the original Last Poets performing twenty-eight numbers adapted from their legendary Concept-East Poetry appearance at New York’s Paperback Theater in 1969. Opening almost simultaneously with Melvin Van Peebles’s Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song, Right On! was described by its producer as “the first ‘totally black film’” making “no concession in language and symbolism to white audiences.” Rarely screened for over thirty years, it was restored from the recently 35mm negative by The Museum of Modern Art with support from the Celeste Bartos Fund for Film Preservation and Paul Newman (San Francisco).

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Coordination : erg (école supérieure des arts), Bruxelles / Camille Pageard

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Information : sammy.del.gallo@erg.be